President 2019/21
David Viner

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COVID-19

All events and meetings are cancelled until further notice.


Gloucester History Festival

Rose Hewlett, editor of Record Series Volume 35 The Gloucestershire Court of Sewers, 1583-1642 will give a virtual talk on Defending Gloucestershire's Coast: 1583-1642 at 2pm on Tuesday 8 September.
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2020 Annual General Meeting

Due to the on-going public health crisis BGAS regret to announce that our plans to reschedule the 2020 AGM have now been abandoned. The loss of the 2020 Annual General Meeting will not prevent BGAS from fulfilling any of its statutory responsibilities and efforts will now be focused on delivering an enhanced Annual General Meeting in Spring 2021, when all outstanding business can be dealt with.

Revised Presidential Periods of Office

David Viner has agreed to remain as BGAS President until Spring 2021. Michael Hare will therefore now become President for 2021/22, with Bob Jones as President elect. Mr Jones will then become President for 2022/23.

Forthcoming Meetings

It is hoped that a Meeting to the Forest of Dean and Newnham on Severn, and Michael Hare's President's Meeting to Apperley and Deerhurst, will now both be held in 2021. Dates and arrangements to be confirmed as soon as possible.

Bob Jones' Presidential Meeting will now take place in 2022. Further details will follow in due course

The BGAS Library is closed until further notice. Arrangements have been made to extend the loan period for any items BGAS members have borrowed until such time as normal library services are resumed.

Gloucestershire Record Series - a bumper year!

Undaunted by the lockdown, the Society is pleased to announce that in 2020, Record Series subscribers will be receiving not one but TWO volumes. Volume 34 provides a uniquely detailed insight into the 'problem of the poor' - at least, those unfortunates who fell on hard times in 19th-century Cheltenham, and who had to be examined by magistrates, to assess where they were 'settled'. In short, were they to be a burden on Cheltenham's ratepayers, or could they be shown to be the responsibility of another parish?

Volume 35 is an edition of a very different sort of record - the Tudor and early Stuart Commissioners of Sewers in Gloucestershire. Responsible for the proper management of water-courses, drainage and coastal defences along the Severn estuary, the commissioners were a vital strand of local government, responsible for overseeing not just year-in, year-out maintenance, but also the response to literally overwhelming rare events such as the 1607 Flood.

In their different ways, both volumes shed considerable light on the response of contemporary officialdom to practical issues that still affect the county today - on the one hand, misfortune disrupting normal family life, and on the other, too much water in the wrong place at the wrong time.

We are hoping that both volumes will be launched to the accompaniment of talks by their respective editors at the Gloucester History Festival in September, as happened last year. As and when firmer arrangements can be made, we will be making suitable announcements.

We are able to bring you an extra issue this year because of the great generosity of several institutions and individuals with a particular interest in the Sewers volume, without whom early publication would not have been possible.

With this extra treat on offer, make no mistake: THIS IS THE YEAR TO SIGN UP, if you're not already a Record Series subscriber (currently a modest £15 supplement to the ordinary membership subscription). Please email [email protected] to subscribe.

Gloucester, the Roman forum and the post-Roman sequence at the city centre

The is a final report of some quite special discoveries made at the centre of Gloucester a very long time ago (1968-71) is now available. It uses present-day knowledge and has discussions of Roman and Late Saxon Gloucester, and it makes much use of documentary evidence for the more recent periods. If you're interested in the city's archaeology, this should give a feel of it over many centuries. For further information or to obtain a copy, go to https://www.gloucesterarchaeologicalpublications.co.uk/.

Gloucestershire Hearth Tax 1672

The transcription of the Gloucestershire Hearth Tax 1672 has been made available by Jan Broadway. She hopes when time permits to produce a full scholarly edition and analysis, but feels researchers may appreciate access to the transcription in the meantime.

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